The sled is sitting outside of its home, the only home on 1st St. in the North Pole. Dasher, Dancer, Prancer, Vixen, Comet, Cupid, Donner, Blitzen and Rudolph are patiently waiting for Mr. Claus to come outside to commence the night’s journey. But he has to give a speedy farewell to the Mrs. first, and besides, the V12 Hemi engine on the sleigh isn’t going to warm itself.

Moments later, Santa and the reindeer are finally off. They’re set for a long night of gift giving and travel. With over seven billion people across the globe, Santa has a lot of work cut out for himself. And how does he actually do it?

santa-claus

We took an inside look at how many homes Santa visits on a given Christmas. (Unfortunately we weren’t able to go with him for this story. Hopefully next year.)

About Those Houses 

With over seven billion people on the planet that span across seven different continents, four oceans and 195 countries, Santa has a lot of distance, and only 24 different time zones to accomplish his goal of getting gifts to every household that celebrates Christmas.

Fortunately for Santa, not everyone celebrates the holiday. And some don’t actually celebrate on the 25th of December, so he’s saved some travel. In countries like Qatar and Mongolia, only expat communities celebrate Christmas, while Orthodox Christians in Egypt celebrate on January 7th.

We’ve seen a few different calculations, but most of them are in the same range. It’s guessed that considering the various time zones, Santa has 31 to 32 hours to deliver gifts.

This means the sled and reindeer will have to move pretty fast, so picking on Rudolph is going to have to take place after the holidays, because Santa will surely need Rudolph’s red nose as a guiding light at some point in the journey.

According to Real Simple, Santa will need to visit 823 homes per second to complete his tasks, while the Daily Mail says that Santa will need to visit 5,556 homes every second on Christmas Eve. The trip according to Daily Mail’s totals would amount to 640 million stops.

We can’t confirm which of these calculations is correct, since we’ve seen a few varying options, but we can say that Santa’s work is cut out for him. You can take your pick on which calculation is the most likely, or if you have the spare time, take a look into the math.

Mr. Claus will need a lot of fuel for his journey, but remember, he isn’t willing to consume everything. His favorite food is chocolate chip cookies, but venison burgers, jerky, or other deer made items will always find themselves left off of the list.

Are you curious where you will be whenever Santa makes a stop by your home on Christmas Eve? Thanks to NORAD (the North American Aerospace Defense Command) you can follow Santa in real-time through their Santa tracker. Just make sure to be a little patient if he isn’t on perfect schedule. He does have many homes to travel to after all.